Scientific Method and Theory

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About the course

  • Responsible for the course: Harald Holone (h@hiof.no)
  • Official course description

Assignments and Final

There are 4 assignments and 1 final assigned to this course.

Final will take place November 29th and 30th, 2016, please sign up for a time slot below. Should there be any time conflicts please contact me so we can arrange for an alternative time.

Schedule

The course is seminar based, with a total of four two-day seminars during the autumn. The program for each of the seminars will be published as soon as they are ready.

Monday August 22nd

Room: E1-064

  • 9:15-10:15 Introduction and welcome, plus your first in-class assignment
  • 10:30-11:30 Presentation round with focus on your research orientation and/or interest
  • 11:30-12:15 Lunch
  • 12:15-13:15 Harald presents some of his research, and perspective on computer science research
  • 13:30-14:30 Guest lecture: Professor Srećko Gajović: "Medical research and the role of big data and machine learning"
  • 14:45-15:45 Panel:"Cross-disciplinary research: The case of Knowledge Landscapes; common quest, different approaches"
  • 15:45-16:00 Summary and presentation of your assigment for the September seminar

Presentations, links and papers

Tuesday August 23rd

Room:D1-053

Edgar Bostrøm: Epistemology: how do we know that we know what we (think we) know?

  • Concepts
  • Knowledge: historical overview (antics - enlightment - romantism - modernism - post-modernism and beyond)
  • What does it mean to know things
  • Where does knowledge come from?
  • Popper and alternatives. Kuhn and alternatives.
  • Different views on science (incl. hard vs. soft)
  • Can we understand each other: is (an illusion of) intersubjectivity the best we can hope for?

Presented material - for consideration

Thursday September 15th

Room: E1-059

  • 09:15-10:15 Recap with Edgar Bostrøm and hand-in assignment 1
  • 10:30-11:45 Student Presentations
  • 12:00-13:00 Research Park - CERN presentation across the street
  • 13:00-14.00 Roland Olsson - Lecture on Machine Learning
  • 14:15 -15:00 Roland Olsson - Lecture on Machine Learning continued
  • 15:15-16:00 Team work (we will form groups of 2-3 students)

Assignment 2

  • Assignment 2 due October 13, 2016

Handed out in class

Presentations, links and papers

Friday September 16th

Room: E1-059

  • 09:15-10:15 Roland Olsson - Lecture on Automatic Programming
  • 10:30-11:30 Roland Olsson - Lecture on Automatic Programming continued
  • 11:30-12:15 Lunch
  • 12:15-13:15 Lars Vidar Magnusson - Lecture on Image Analysis & Automatic Programming
  • 13:30-14:30 Lars Vidar Magnusson - Lecture on Image Analysis & Automatic Programming continued
  • 14:45-15:45 Q&A
  • 15:45-16:00 Team work

Before you go today, please sign up for office hrs with Dr. Olsson to go over your work. Please come prepared.

Presentations, links and papers

Assignment 3

Write a short summary of the scientific method used in one of the papers cited in my presentation. Try to take advantage of the theory introduced earlier in this course. The summary should be handed in at the next gathering. My presentation can be found at http://www.it.hiof.no/~larsvmag/lecture16092016.pdf

Thursday September 29, 2016.

Office hrs with Dr. Olsson, Office: D1-036

   09.00-09.30: <Pernille, Tina>
   09.30-10.00: <ledig>   
   10.00-10.30: <ledig>
   10.30-11.00: <Ledig>
   11.00-11.30: Mohamad, Jon

LUNSJ

   12.00-12.30: Håvard Myrbakken, Reidar Trømborg, Ian Martin Aydin
   12.30-13.00: Michael,Samad og Roberth
   13.00-13.30: <ledig>
   13.30-14.00: Øystein, Anette, Frank Ronny

If you have not already met with Dr. Olsson please make sure you make arrangements to see him. If you need any additional help before Thursday get a hold of him.

Thursday October 13th

Room: F1-060

  • 09:15-10:15 Recap with Roland Olsson and hand-in assignment
  • 10:30-11:30 Student Presentations (create a max 10 min PPT presentation)
  • 11:30-12:15 Lunch
  • 12:15-13:15 Øystein Haugen - Lecture on The Challenges of Designing a Modeling Language
  • 13:30-14:30 Øystein Haugen - Lecture on The Challenges of Designing a Modeling Language continued
  • 14:45-15:45 Øystein Haugen - Lecture on The Challenges of Designing a Modeling Language continued
  • 15:45-16:00 Q&A

Presentations, links and papers

Friday October 14th

Room: F1-060

  • 09:15-10:15 Cathrine Linnes - Lecture on Social Media
  • 10:30-11:30 Cathrine Linnes - Lecture on Social Network Analysis
  • 11:30-12:15 Lunch
  • 12:15-13:15 Cathrine Linnes - Lecture on Social Network Analysis continued
  • 13:30-14:30 Cathrine Linnes - Lecture on IoT
  • 14:45-15:45 Cathrine Linnes - Teamwork and hand out assignment 4
  • 15:45-16:00 Q&A

Presentations, links and papers


Assignment 4

  • For Assignment 4 I want you to use the ENRON dataset I distributed to you via e-mail. If you need another copy please contact me. Use NodeXL or Gephi to analyze your dataset.
  • Objectives: After completing this assignment and the related readings you should be able to a) explain foundational concepts of social network analysis, b) use NodeXL or Gephi to analyze and visualize social networks, c) determine the quality of social network visualizations and identify ways of improving them, and d) use social network analysis to examine social media interactions.
  • Outline: First write an introduction to the case, next explain the method applied and the dataset. For the visualization part, tell the reader what you have done to filter the dataset (experiment with various filtering and labels). Show screen shots and at the end you will have a conclusion. In your conclusion describe what you saw as well as describe the insight you have gained from the visualization and /or metrics.
  • Introduction
  • Method
  • Visualization
  • Conclusion
  • Name: Make sure your name is on the cover page.

Analyzing organizational email can provide a wealth of social information that can inform important decisions and support novel interventions. Organizations can identify unique social roles, individual who span the gaps between organizational silos, internal influencers, and employees in need of creating more connections.

In a standard email netwrok, vertices represent email addresses or corresponding people and edges or ties are created when a message is sent from one email address to another. Edges are directed because messages are transferred from a sender to a receiver. These ties are weighted by the number of messages sent between two individuals.

Examples of several questions that can be asked: Who are the important individuals within an organization? Who is contacted most often? Who are the influencers or topical experts? Who are unwanted or troublesome correspondents? Who are unresponsive recipients? Who is not well connected and could benefit from more social ties? How do email based groupings differ from organizational structures? How is the org-chart different form the chart of the flow of email? How are groups interconnected? Which groups should be better connected? How does information flow through the organization? How do connections among individuals and subgroups evolve over time? How are social relations affected by a major event such as a merger or opening of a new office? Can we identify up and coming stars or unique social roles based on their network structure?

Monday November 7th

Room: D1-052

  • 09:15-10:15 Recap with Cathrine Linnes, hand-in assignment, talk about final.
  • 10:30-11:30 Student Presentations (max 10 min per group).
  • 11:30 -12:15 Lunch
  • 12:15 -13:15 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios - Lecture on how to write a research paper
  • 13:30-14:30 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios - Lecture on how to write a research paper continued
  • 14:45-15:45 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios - Lecture on how to write a research paper continued
  • 15:45-16:00 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios - Lecture on how to write a research paper continued

Presentations, links and papers

Tuesday November 8th

Room: D1-053

  • 09:15-10:15 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios Lecture on Introduction to Computing Discipline
  • 10:30-11:30 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios Lecture on Introduction to Computing Discipline continued
  • 11:30 -12:15 Lunch
  • 12:15 -13:15 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios Lecture on my prior research
  • 13:30-14:30 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios Lecture on my prior research continued
  • 14:45-15:45 Ricardo Colomo-Palacios Lecture on my prior research continued
  • 15:45-16:00 Q&A

Tuesday November 29, 2016.

Examination Sensor: Cathrine Linnes and Roland Olsson

Room: D1-038

   12.00-12.30: <Tina Helene Bunæs>
   12.30-13.00: <Håvard Myrbakken>
   13.00-13.30: <Pernille Elvegaard>
   13.30-14.00: <Frank Ronny Johansen>
   14.00-14.30: <Mohamad Jalloul>
   14.30-15.00: <Øystein Solberg>
   15.00-15.30: <Ian Martin Aydin>
   15.30-16.00: <ledig>

Wednesday November 30, 2016.

Examination Sensor: Cathrine Linnes and Roland Olsson

Room: D1-038

   12.00-12.30: <Roberth Johansen>
   12.30-13.00: <ledig>
   13.00-13.30: <Anton Ilchenko>
   13.30-14.00: <ledig>
   14.00-14.30: <Reidar Trømborg>
   14.30-15.00: <Jon Vegard Gribsrød>
   15.00-15.30: <Abdul Samad Kakar>
   15.30-16.00: <ledig>

Monday December 5, 2016.

Examination Sensor: Cathrine Linnes and Roland Olsson

Room: D1-038

   12.30-13.00: <Michael Glomnes>
   13.00-13.30: <Frode Tennebø>

Final Exam

As final exam the student develops and presents a research proposal based on his/her interest within the discipline showing perception of research design approaches.   The proposal should be as long as the student deems necessary (most student submit papers that are 7 pages double spaced/3-4 page single spaced not including references and cover page). However, the course professor prizes parsimony, so lengthy and poorly focused proposals will not score well.

The proposal should have an introduction to the problem or opportunity, clearly state the research question, further discuss some literature review, mention potential methodologies and round off with a summary. In terms of references you should have 10-15 references. References to follow APA format.

Outline:

  • Introduction
  • Research Question
  • Literature Review
  • Methodology
  • Summary
  • References

Students are to turn in their proposals by 8.00AM  29/11/16 so we have this for your oral presentation. For your oral presentation, please prepare power points slides (copy and past in information from your report). Presentation to be approximately 10-15 minutes with questions and answers at the end. We will discuss further at our next meeting November 7th. However, if you have any questions in the mean while please do not hesitate to ask.